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One pot chicken & greens

We all know we should eat more vegetables – especially green leafy vegetables. This recipe is an easy, one-pot dinner with a healthy dose of greens.

  • L/D Lunch/Dinner
  • DF Dairy free
  • GF Gluten free
  • Prep time 10 mins
  • Cook Time 30 mins
  • Serves 4
  • Difficulty medium
19img recipe one pot chicken greens

Method

  1. Heat oil in a large, heavy-based saucepan on medium-high heat. Brown and seal the chicken a few minutes each side (you may need to do this in two batches). Remove chicken and keep aside.
  2. Reduce heat to medium, add leek and garlic, cook until slightly softened. Increase heat, add zucchini and continue cooking for a few minutes.
  3. Add mushrooms. Butter can be stirred through to coat vegetables.
  4. Return the chicken to the pot. Add the whole bunch of thyme (stems can be removed later).
  5. Add cabbage and other green vegetables. Cover for a few minutes.
  6. Add seasoning, reduce heat and cook for about 15-20 minutes or until the meat starts to come away from the bone.
  7. Check seasoning. Serve and enjoy!

Nutritional information

By Jean Hailes naturopath and herbalist Sandra Villella

Most Australians do not eat the recommended 5 serves of vegetables per day, and some authorities are suggesting we aim for 7-9 serves per day to reduce the risk of some diseases! Any vegetables can be used for this dish, but include cabbage, zucchini and mushrooms as these create the juice for this dish.

A diet high in fruit and vegetables is associated with better bone density, most likely the result of their higher potassium and lower 'acidic' content.

Green vegetables are also a rich source of folic acid, especially when raw, because folic acid is sensitive to heat. Eating cabbage (and other members of the Brassica family) regularly can reduce the risk of certain cancers, including breast cancer.