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Dr Robyn Williams

  • Team Lead, WA Next Generation Aboriginal Youth Well Being Project
  • Chairperson, FASD Collaborations (Perth)
  • Master of Arts, and BA in Sociology/Anthropology

Dr Robyn Williams is a Nyoongar woman and since 2008 has supported families caring for children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) as an advocate. Robyn has a long and diverse employment background, spanning over 20 years in Aboriginal community-based agencies, government sector and academia. Other qualifications include a Master of Arts, and BA in Sociology/Anthropology.

In 2018, Dr Williams completed her PhD on FASD in Perth and the south west region of WA. This is the first FASD study to include case studies of Aboriginal relative carers and is the largest consultation on FASD with First Nations people of 180 Aboriginal people. This study includes best practice relating to FASD interventions, cultural security and supporting children and families with FASD. In 2019, this study received a Chancellors commendation for excellence.

Her research interests include the impact of FASD across the lifespan, FASD interventions for children and families, including the development of workforce training on FASD; Culture as intervention and decolonising approaches to FASD and research; FASD and Out of Home Care.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)

What are you planning to do with your fellowship and how it will help your career?

This fellowship will allow me the opportunity to collaborate and work in partnership with leading International FASD experts including Professor Dorothy Badry from the University of Calgary and Professor Michelle Stewart at the University of Regina. Prof Stewart's expertise includes FASD and the criminal justice system, while Prof Badry's expertise includes developing curriculum on FASD at the tertiary and community level; and FASD and the child welfare system.

The fellowship will also allow me to attend International FASD conferences in Canada and participate in further FASD training in Calgary in the next 12 months, such as the Parent Child and Assistance programme with the aim to adapt for both the Aboriginal and mainstream community.

Robyn Williams